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Disorderly Conduct Attorney in Denver County – C.R.S. 18-9-106

Contact a Disorderly Conduct lawyer at the O'Malley Law Office if facing charges.Normal, everyday activities can quickly deteriorate into charges of Disorderly Conduct, particularly when alcohol is involved.  A person can be charged with Disorderly Conduct in Denver and Arapahoe County if he or she intentionally does any of the following in a public place:

  • Makes an offensive gesture while driving
  • Makes excessive noise
  • Fights in a public place such as a sporting event or a bar
  • Shoots a gun or other firearm in a public place
  • Shows a gun, knife, or any item that could be considered deadly in an attempt to cause distress or mentions that one is present

Disorderly Conduct Lawyer in Douglas and Adams County: Some Examples of Disorderly Conduct

1.Road Rage
Drivers frequently experience conflict with other drivers in Douglas County who intentionally cut them off or who carelessly impede the progress of others.  Making a rude gesture while driving, such as giving someone the middle finger because they cut you off in traffic or because they were driving slow, is a good example of this crime. Just because everyone “seems” to be expressing their frustration by flipping off others, does not mean that you will not get caught. We have also seen instances where another driver reacts violently, even pulling out a weapon.  Innocent gestures to relieve your stress can result in you being accused of Disorderly Conduct.
2.Fights
The same could be said of making excessive noise or fighting in Adams County. Let’s say you are having a party while watching a football game. You invite a few people over. There is food and drinks. People are having a good time. All of the sudden, a discrepancy over a referee’s call arises. A fight breaks out at the party because alcohol is involved.  Loyal feelings for your team can result in yelling and tempers getting hot. A neighbor calls the cops because of the shouting and loud noises. What happens? An officer comes to your home. What started out as a good time might result in an arrest or with a criminal Summons for Disorderly Conduct.
3.Firearms and Weapons
The police will not be understanding when a gun is involved in a dispute.
The fourth and fifth examples involve potential charges of discharging a gun, firearm, or displaying a weapon in Douglas and Adams County.  These often arise when teenagers are trying to impress other people. They want to prove themselves to someone older or intimidate someone younger. They may state they have a gun or even show off the firearm itself. Unfortunately, these words and actions can lead to accusations of Disorderly Conduct. State Patrol Officers, local police or sheriff deputies will not be understanding when a firearm is involved.

Disorderly Conduct Lawyer in Jefferson County: Charges and Accusations of Disorderly Conduct in Colorado

Disorderly Conduct charges made in Jefferson County can range from a Class 1 Petty Offense up to a Class 2 or 3 misdemeanor. Multiple sentencing options are available to the court if you are found guilty, including probation or a possible jail sentence of 6 – 12 months.  Fines can range from $50-$1000.  A lighter sentence which could be handed down by the judge could include straight probation, community service, and a possible behavior management class.

Get Help Now

A Disorderly Conduct charge in Adams County or any surrounding county such as Boulder or Broomfield needs to be taken seriously. The experienced attorneys at O’Malley Law Office have years of experience in defending those accused of this charge. Call us today at
303-830-0880. Together, we can protect your future.
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Colorado Disorderly Conduct Statute: C.R.S. 18-9-106

“A person commits disorderly conduct if her or she intentionally, knowingly, or recklessly:

(a) Makes a coarse and obviously offensive utterance, gesture, or display in a public place and the utterance, gesture, or display tends to incite an immediate breach of the peace; or

(b) (Deleted by amendment, L. 2000, p. 708, 39, effective July 1, 2000.)

(c) Makes unreasonable noise in a public place or near a private residence that he has no right to occupy; or

(d) Fights with another in a public place except in an amateur or professional contest of athletic skill; or

(e) Not being a peace officer, discharges a firearm in a public place except when engaged in lawful target practice or hunting; or

(f) Not being a peace officer, displays a deadly weapon, displays any article used or fashioned in a manner to cause a person to reasonably believe that the article is a deadly weapon, or represents verbally or otherwise that he or she is armed with a deadly weapon in a public place in a manner calculated to alarm.”